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Promotion: La Cage aux Folles – Sunnyvale Community Players

Sunnyvale Community Players finishes its 49th season with a groundbreaking Harvey Fierstein/Jerry Herman classic, La Cage aux Folles, which runs at the Sunnyvale Community Theatre Thursdays – Sundays, 21 April – 12 May. Fierstein and Herman didn’t originate the story – Jean Poiret did that in 1973 with the play that spawned multiple adaptations for the big screen and the stage. The first adaptation of the play was for the screen in the 1978 Franco-Italian comedy of the same that received many accolades from critics worldwide. There were two sequels to the original film. The first was released in 1980, and the second followed in 1985. In 1996, the Mike Nichols/Elaine May American remake, titled The Birdcage and starring Robin Williams and Nathan Lane, made the rounds, and it continues to be a popular film today.

The Fierstein/Herman Broadway adaptation hit the stage in 1983 to a fairly warm reception. Over the years, several revivals have surfaced, and each garnered more award nominations than the original, all noted for their witty dialogue, accessible story, and typical Jerry Herman music that’s full of flash and zest to go with the lively choreography. SCP is presenting the 2010 version of the show. [Continue reading]


As has been mentioned in several articles about the Sunnyvale Community Players’ production of Fiddler on the Roof, the run was special for many reasons, not the least of which was an amazing man dealing with a terminal illness. Eric Sun made it through the run, playing beautifully every single performance, but he didn’t last very long after the run ended. Although Eric died on Thanksgiving Day in 2017, this is how so many will remember him.

Throughout the run, this show dazzled audiences garnering two standing ovations every performance, but not only because of Eric. Here’s a favorite (and iconic) snippet from closing weekend. The action on stage was impressive, but the music from under the stage was this musician’s focus:

For more articles on this tremendous community production, see:
SCP’s ‘Fiddler’ 2017 Tech Week Chronicles from the pit
‘Fiddler’ 2017 breaks all SCP records – L’Chaim!


Book Review: The Student Conductor – Robert Ford

“The Student Conductor” masterfully merges politics, history, fiction, and musical reality

Robert Ford isn’t exactly a household name, and it’s been over a decade since he published his first (and seemingly only) novel. He went on to write several award-winning one-act and full-length plays that have been produced both in the U.S. and in Europe, but his novel remains a unique work. The Student Conductor was first published in the U.S. in 2003 with subsequent editions in Europe and Australia. It gives readers a look into Ford’s imagination as he conjures up plenty of intrigue and heart. He also guides readers deep into the magical world of classical music giving them an idea of just what it takes to become a professional symphony conductor. [Continue reading]


Book Review: Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind – Yuval Noah Harari

‘Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind – a story of where came from and where we might be going

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari, was first published in the U.S. in 2015, and it took the country by storm. It quickly became a New York Times best seller and is used in numerous history courses around the country. Great Britain saw its English language release a year earlier in 2014, but the author’s countrymen saw it first published in his native Hebrew a few years before that in 2011. Beyond that, the book has been translated into over thirty languages worldwide, and at least the American English version is credited as being translated by Harari, with help from John Purcell and Haim Watzman. Why did Sapiens:… make such a splash around the world? It tells a fascinating story. Harari is an Israeli born historian and a tenured history professor at Hebrew University of Jerusalem with a passion for how every human endeavor affects history and the world. [Continue reading]


Commentary: The piano: the principal prelude to musical prowess

There is no question that music touches us deeply. There are also myriad studies showing the cognitive benefits of listening, but there are even more benefits when actively participating in making music. For the purposes of this discussion, the assumption is that the reader, for whatever reason, is now intent on learning to play a musical instrument. Whether their goal is personal or professional, an initial instrument must be chosen, i.e., they have to start somewhere. This commentary proposes that the piano be that starting point. [Continue reading]


Commentary: Why care about classical music?

Many years ago when I was still married, my husband asked me if I would have become a musician if my parents hadn’t played instruments. I told him that there was no way to know for sure if my study and lifelong affinity for music would have happened had I not had my early childhood exposure. That answer surprised him a bit. He knew that I grew up with music as a very important part of our family life, a subject I wrote about in my book, Remembering Mom and Dad, in the story entitled Music in the House. He also frequently had to put up with my practicing various instruments for my numerous musical endeavors. [Continue reading]


Book: REMEMBERING MOM AND DAD

Remembering_Mom_and__Cover_for_KindleIn REMEMBERING MOM AND DAD, I make the jump from analyzing the stories to telling them.  The book is a collection of essays and short stories written over time remembering Bayla and Jerry Jacobson. The stories include personal recollections from my experience along with the retelling of numerous events related to me in conversations over the years. Some of the stories included are: “Music in the House”, “The Parenthood Plunge”, “The Jacobson Pet Parade”, “Disney Days of Summer”, and many more.  Interested?

Purchase the print edition:

Purchase a digital copy in Kindle or Nook formats.
Read the full Introduction.


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2 thoughts on “Home

  1. It’s a shame you don’t have a donate button! I’d without a doubt donate to this excellent blog! I suppose for now i’ll settle for book-marking and adding your RSS feed to my Google account.
    I look forward to fresh updates and will talk about this website with my Facebook group.

    Chat soon!

    Like

    • Alexander, in a sense there is a donate button now that A Good Reed Review has joined affiliate programs with Amazon. The products and references that are listed in conjunction with those help to emphasize the subjects we discuss on A Good Reed Review, and they also help us out a little to keep this site free.

      Like

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