The Course of Life

Fiction by Ande Jacobson

Ken started on the course early Sunday morning. With the sun slowly rising, illuminating the tiny droplets of dew covering the greens and fairways, Ken adjusted his cap on his neatly trimmed dark brown hair, stretched his long arms, placed his lengthy frame in position to address the ball, and hit his first tee shot. His swing connected beautifully but, alas, he had overcompensated for his nagging slice and severely hooked the ball. Ken watched his ball sail well out to the right until he lost sight of it as it peaked behind the tree line separating the first and ninth fairways.

“Quaaack!” Ken heard as he picked up his clubs. “I must have hit a duck over there,” he thought.

Since he went out as a single in the early mornings, he didn’t have to wait for other members of a foursome. He walked through the tree line and halfway down the ninth fairway following the flight path of his ball. He spotted the ball lying atop the single mound in the center of the fairway and looked around but couldn’t find any obvious evidence of the duck he thought the ball struck in flight. Continue reading

Taming the Savage Spring

Fiction by Ande Jacobson

Thomas Drummond peered through the lobby door at the gray sky and the slick walkway winding through the parking lot outside of his Drummond Software Solutions (DSS) headquarters in Guttersburg, Maryland. He couldn’t tell how much of the reflection off the pavement was water and how much was ice, but he couldn’t wait any longer. He had to get to his appointment. He always dreaded the dangers that awaited him just beyond the lobby during the savage spring. This was the most treacherous time of the year, late March.

It was still cold enough at times to encounter a thin layer of ice on the pavement in the early morning or at night, but it was often warm enough during the heat of the day to spark a change in the air. For many, spring meant an awakening as the flowers started to bloom and wildlife cycles began anew. While beautiful from a distance, sometimes that awakening could get just a little too close, which made spring more dangerous than winter, at least some of the time. Continue reading